Implementing a data policy: a how-to guide for publishers

OASPA is pleased to publish this guest post on the subject of open data and data sharing, co-authored by Fiona Murphy and Bob Samors. The post provides helpful practical advice drawn from a wealth of resources,  to enable publishers and editors to play a key role in the important movement to make data accessible.

Authors: Fiona Murphy, Murphy Mitchell Consulting Ltd and Bob Samors, Coordination Officer – Belmont Forum e-Infrastructures and Data Management Project

As the global Open/FAIR Data movement continues to gather momentum, we are seeing increasing signs of convergence among the various segments of the data ecosystem (researchers, funders, publishers, data training and service providers), and across various disciplines.

Link to the full text here.

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Fiona Murphy
Guest Post — Open Research in Practice: Moving from Why to How?

Editor’s note: This guest post is authored for The Scholarly Kitchen by Fiona Murphy, Nicky Agate, Amy Price, and Stephanie Hagstrom, members of the Steering Committee for FSCI, a training and educational week taking place this year at the University of California, Los Angeles on August 5-9.

Today’s research knowledge can be harvested and data analyzed faster than has been possible in all previous generations combined. As a result, Open Research practices and outputs face a number of tensions between initial intentions and unforeseen consequences. For example, the FAIR Data Principles propose that research data should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable — but nothing has prepared us for the use and misuse of personal data. Even if they start out ethically approved and safe in the researcher’s toolkit, they can later be sold to a third party in exchange for analytical services, enabling machines to identify disease states from a picture, classify your intelligence and demographic profile in four “likes” or less, or traffic organs and direct market to those that need them on social media.

Link to full post here.

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Plan S: What Implications Does it Have on Learned Societies?

Learned societies have been under pressure for some time. While traditionally, most societies have relied on a combination of meetings and publication inducements (for example, free or substantially subsidized copies of the society’s journals) to provide their headline value proposition for membership, recent developments in digital scholarly offerings (such as multi-person, remote user access to journals) compounded by Open Access business models have significantly reduced their sway.

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Fiona MurphyComment
A Truly Awesome Meeting, IDW Botswana, November 2018

Blogpost written for the Research Data Alliance as part of an RDA EU Expert Researcher Grant award.

“I was immensely pleased to be able to attend this event due to an Expert Researcher Grant from RDA Europe. As always, there were a number of sessions I was looking forward to contributing to, and many people I wanted to see. But this was also the first time that both I and International Data Week had come to Africa, and I knew this would make it a very special meeting.

Having arrived at the venue after a long – largely uneventful – journey, we were greeted by monkeys and peacocks in the hotel bar, some very welcome refreshments and, most welcome of all, warmth and sunshine. Coming from the UK in November, the weather was a wonderful contrast from home. Conversely, the plugs, roads (driving on the left), and afternoon tea arrangements were absolutely familiar!

Having been lucky enough to get to IDW, I was determined to pack a lot into the meeting, so started by attending the RDA Co-Chairs meeting on the Sunday afternoon. We discussed some interesting developments for subsequent Plenaries, but the Council Members managed to keep the location for the 14th Plenary a secret from us.”

Link to rest of article here.

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Connecting Funder and Publisher Data Sharing Policies: An Interview with e-Infrastructures Group at the Belmont Forum

Tim Vines interviewed Bob Samors and Fiona Murphy for The Scholarly Kitchen Publishing Blog.

“Plenty of funding agencies have data sharing policies. Plenty of publishers and their individual journals have data sharing policies. Yet despite their alignment of interests, there’s so far been little collaboration between these two major stakeholders in developing coherent data policies. This is especially problematic because the majority of data become (or should become) public alongside a published article, such that one party (funders) are relying on the other (publishers) to promote compliance with their policy. 

In recognition of this issue, the Belmont Forum recently adopted a Data Accessibility Statement developed in conjunction with science publishers. “

Link to full article here.

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Future Pub 11 (#FuturePub)

Earlier this week, I attended my first FuturePub event. Hosted by John Hammersley of Overleaf, it was a heady combination of pizza, drinks, lightning talks and lively networking. (Annoyingly, I had to run for my back-of-beyond train before I turned into a pumpkin, but I suspect that all of these activities were still ongoing as I sat on my train and started this write-up).

 

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Publishing and sharing data papers can increase impact and benefits researchers, publishers, funders and libraries

The process of compiling and submitting data papers to journals has long been a frustrating one to the minority of researchers that have tried. Fiona Murphy, part of a project team working to automate this process, outlines why publishing data papers is important and how open data can be of benefit to all stakeholders across scholarly communications and higher education.

Giving Researchers Credit for their Data – or ‘Data2Paper’ as we’re now more snappily calling it – is a cloud-based app which uses existing DataCite and ORCID-derived metadata to automate the process of compiling and submitting a data paper to a journal without the researcher having to leave the research space or wrestle directly with the journal’s submission system (an occasional source of frustration):

This is an excerpt from a blogpost published on the LSE Impact site in October 2016. Link to the full text is here.

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Fiona MurphyComment
Scholarly Commons and Decision Trees: The Project

I've written another blog post on the FORCE11 website on the Scholarly Commons and Decision Trees work. If you care about Open Science, diversity in research and scholarly communications and would like to comment on what we've done or just find out more, please click this link, and see you on the FORCE11 site or feel free to comment below.

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Fiona MurphyComment
Scholarly Commons and Decision Trees: What, Why and How

"The scholarly commons is an agreement among researchers and other stakeholders in scholarly communication to make research open and participatory for anyone, anywhere. It is not another sharing platform, but a set of principles, concrete guidance to practice, and actions towards inclusivity of diverse perspectives from around the globe.

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Fiona MurphyComment
Giving Researchers Credit for their Data Project

Giving Researchers Credit for their Data is now in its second – development – phase as part of the #dataspring stable. The team of stakeholders (publishers, data repository managers, coders) are developing a simple ‘one-click’ process where data, metadata and methods detail are transferred from a data repository (via an API and a helper app) to a relevant publisher platform for publication as a data paper.

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hannah read
Publishing and sharing data papers can increase impact and benefits researchers, publishers, funders and libraries

Giving Researchers Credit for their Data – or ‘Data2Paper’ as we’re now more snappily calling it – is a cloud-based app which uses existing DataCite and ORCID-derived metadata to automate the process of compiling and submitting a data paper to a journal without the researcher having to leave the research space or wrestle directly with the journal’s submission system (an occasional source of frustration).

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hannah read