Future Pub 11 (#FuturePub)

Earlier this week, I attended my first FuturePub event. Hosted by John Hammersley of Overleaf, it was a heady combination of pizza, drinks, lightning talks and lively networking. (Annoyingly, I had to run for my back-of-beyond train before I turned into a pumpkin, but I suspect that all of these activities were still ongoing as I sat on my train and started this write-up).

 

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Publishing and sharing data papers can increase impact and benefits researchers, publishers, funders and libraries

The process of compiling and submitting data papers to journals has long been a frustrating one to the minority of researchers that have tried. Fiona Murphy, part of a project team working to automate this process, outlines why publishing data papers is important and how open data can be of benefit to all stakeholders across scholarly communications and higher education.

Giving Researchers Credit for their Data – or ‘Data2Paper’ as we’re now more snappily calling it – is a cloud-based app which uses existing DataCite and ORCID-derived metadata to automate the process of compiling and submitting a data paper to a journal without the researcher having to leave the research space or wrestle directly with the journal’s submission system (an occasional source of frustration):

This is an excerpt from a blogpost published on the LSE Impact site in October 2016. Link to the full text is here.

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Fiona MurphyComment
Scholarly Commons and Decision Trees: The Project

I've written another blog post on the FORCE11 website on the Scholarly Commons and Decision Trees work. If you care about Open Science, diversity in research and scholarly communications and would like to comment on what we've done or just find out more, please click this link, and see you on the FORCE11 site or feel free to comment below.

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Fiona MurphyComment
Scholarly Commons and Decision Trees: What, Why and How

"The scholarly commons is an agreement among researchers and other stakeholders in scholarly communication to make research open and participatory for anyone, anywhere. It is not another sharing platform, but a set of principles, concrete guidance to practice, and actions towards inclusivity of diverse perspectives from around the globe.

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Fiona MurphyComment
Giving Researchers Credit for their Data Project

Giving Researchers Credit for their Data is now in its second – development – phase as part of the #dataspring stable. The team of stakeholders (publishers, data repository managers, coders) are developing a simple ‘one-click’ process where data, metadata and methods detail are transferred from a data repository (via an API and a helper app) to a relevant publisher platform for publication as a data paper.

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hannah read
Publishing and sharing data papers can increase impact and benefits researchers, publishers, funders and libraries

Giving Researchers Credit for their Data – or ‘Data2Paper’ as we’re now more snappily calling it – is a cloud-based app which uses existing DataCite and ORCID-derived metadata to automate the process of compiling and submitting a data paper to a journal without the researcher having to leave the research space or wrestle directly with the journal’s submission system (an occasional source of frustration).

Read More
hannah read